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  • Delidding Guide if anyone is interested

    I just copied this over and removed any reference to my website. Premise is the same for any CPU though this was done on a 3770k, thought some people may be interested.



    Let me start with a little warning. The following two procedures I am going to be discussing may result in the permanent
    damage of your CPU or IHS. Please think long and hard before you decide to take a knife to your processor. Also keep in mind that not all Intel
    CPUs can be delidded and the following was done with an Intel 3770k. Please do your research before attempting to delid anything other than Ivy Bridge processors.

    I decided I wanted to break past the 5 Ghz wall of my 3770k.
    I had pushed the CPU to 4.5 Ghz and slowly started climbing beyond 4.8 until I reached a stable 4.9Ghz. I noticed the temperatures weren't bad, low 70s with Intel burn test, far below anything dangerous.
    I decided to push it to 5 Ghz and when I did the temperatures went into the 80s. Keep in mind 80 degrees at that voltage even under water isn't bad. I needed 1.43 volts to get 4.9 Ghz stable,
    to get past the wall and get a stable run with Intel burn test at 5ghz, I needed about 1.52 volts (not recommended unless you like bending the rules). I stumbled across this fun and risky little procedure
    known as delidding. I decided that if I was going to push beyond 5ghz I was going to need to do anything to drop my temperatures.



    Poor contact between the die and the IHS along with poor TIM application can cause significantly higher temperatures. The process of delidding allows it to be redone right, which I would say sounds
    pretentious, except it works. The First step is to make sure you are working on an anti-static surface, paper will work. The majority of processor damage is actually caused by static rather than physical damage with the knife.
    Also use an anti-static bracelet if you have one. The hardest part is getting the blade between the PCB and the IHS. I found it easiest to start with the centre of the blade on the corner of the CPU as opposed to using
    the corner of the blade on the side. Wiggle the knife left and right slowly and keep pressure towards the IHS to avoid scratching the PCB. Once you have got the blade in, carefully wiggle the blade from
    Corner to corner making sure you don't push in to far as you do not want to scratch the die. You can see in the picture bellow, roughly how wide the glue is applied. Once you have gone all the way around, carefully pull the IHS away from
    the PCB.



    After you have separated the IHS from the PCB you will want to remove all the old thermal paste and use your nail to gently remove as much of the left over glue as possible.



    Now that you have put all that hard work into removing the IHS you don't want to use just any old thermal paste; In fact, you don't want to use thermal paste at all. Liquid Ultra is the only thing you want to put on the die. Made by Coollaboratory, Liquid Ultra is 100% metal which unlike thermal paste, must be spread in an even thin layer when applying. It also works significantly better than traditional thermal paste. In my case I originally applied arctic silver after delidding and lapping the
    the IHS which dropped the temperatures by approximately 10 degrees. I ordered Liquid Ultra the same week and after applying it both to the die and between the water block and IHS I saw an additional 15 degree drop in temperature
    for a total approximate difference of 25 degrees. You can order Liquid Ultra from www.coollaboratory.com for 8.90 Euros. Your application should look something like this:



    Gently put the CPU in place without the IHS. Place the IHS on top of the CPU but make sure to place it slightly higher than where it is supposed to be as it will get pushed down slightly when you close the latch.
    Hold the IHS in place with one finger while closing the latch with your free hand. If all went well you shouldn't even be able to tell that the IHS was placed in separately.



    There is actually one other thing you may want to do which I mentioned at the beginning, lap the IHS. The surface of the IHS may be slightly uneven and therefore your water block
    or heatsink won't make complete contact. Sanding the surface flat may decrease temperatures by a few degrees. I noticed a difference when doing this but you may decide it is not worth the time it takes to sand it down.

  • #2
    Bareback without the IHS is even better, cuts out the middleman.
    3770K IHS removed-Max V gene-2x4gig ram Gskills 2400 Trident X-2x400watt Qmax TEC`s with dew point controller-420 Monsta rad for TEC hotside-360 TFC Xchanger for dual 670`s-RP452 res with 2xD5 vario pumps- HF Supreme with modified plate-DD Cp Pro pump for cold side of TEC and cpu block-Dual CM haf 922`s and a Seasonic X-1250 Psu

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    • #3
      Originally posted by gdesmo View Post
      Bareback without the IHS is even better, cuts out the middleman.
      Always use protection

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      • #4
        We shouldn't talk like this around Bart. He's still a virgin, wouldn't want to corrupt him you know.
        3770K IHS removed-Max V gene-2x4gig ram Gskills 2400 Trident X-2x400watt Qmax TEC`s with dew point controller-420 Monsta rad for TEC hotside-360 TFC Xchanger for dual 670`s-RP452 res with 2xD5 vario pumps- HF Supreme with modified plate-DD Cp Pro pump for cold side of TEC and cpu block-Dual CM haf 922`s and a Seasonic X-1250 Psu

        Comment


        • #5
          hahaha that's awesome, on another note, how easy is it to accidentally crush the die? Gonna have to delid again when I pick up a 6700k and maybe I can just run without IHS as you say, though I heard that the pcb is thinner on skylake...

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          • #6
            I think the best way is the vise. A hammer, a block of hard wood and the CPU in the vise and that's it.


            See here for how to do it: http://www.overclock.net/t/1313179/o...ded-club-guide
            Ryzen 3600 WC-Asus Tuf B550M Gaming Plus-Video Asus GTX 1080 Ti Turbo WC-XPG Spectrix D50 3600 4X8Gb-Samsung 950Pro 512 Gb M.2-HP N550 1Tb M.2 -Seasonic Focus Gold 650watts -Asus VG 248 Qh 1920X1080 144 Hz-Windows 10 Pro.MetallicGear Neo V2 Matx modded

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            • #7
              Not a bad guide but I think with this product coming in the future I'd rather spend extra cash on this (Even if its rumored to be like 80 euro) to know theres no chance of knicking my PCB and wrecking the brand new CPU..I think I'd cry if I bought a 6700k and wrecked it in the process of delidding lol

              http://www.guru3d.com/news-story/del...-die-mate.html

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              • #8
                I preferred the method that used only a vice and no hammer, just because I was scared of killing my $300 CPU.

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fo1KzqCQurk
                My Imgur

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by vieuxchnock View Post
                  I think the best way is the vise. A hammer, a block of hard wood and the CPU in the vise and that's it.


                  See here for how to do it: http://www.overclock.net/t/1313179/o...ded-club-guide
                  That's a great method if you have a vice and balls of steel :p

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                  • #10
                    What would be the main reason to delid? lower temps I am assuming? I would try it first on my older cpu.
                    i7 4790k at 4.4 at 1.25 volts MSI Lightning 290x in crossfire Core clock 1200 and memory clock at 1550

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                    • #11
                      Intel has purposefully used some crappy TIM between the guts of the CPU and the Lid that comes in contact with our heatsinks.

                      remove the lid, apply better TIM, and shazzam... better heat transfer = better overclocks.
                      HAF932 Mods
                      C70 Mods

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by bungwirez View Post
                        Intel has purposefully used some crappy TIM between the guts of the CPU and the Lid that comes in contact with our heatsinks.

                        remove the lid, apply better TIM, and shazzam... better heat transfer = better overclocks.
                        Other part of the problem is the glue that holds the ihs on is too thick and gives poor contact between the die and lid. It's a mix of both. If you just delid and remove the glue and put regular old paste back on you'll get a good drop, but if you go one stuff further and use liquid ultra, you will be a happy camper.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by medic0901 View Post
                          What would be the main reason to delid? lower temps I am assuming? I would try it first on my older cpu.
                          As far as I know the problems with poor contact and bad Tim started with ivy bridge, but would be good to practice on an old CPU.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by deehoC View Post
                            Not a bad guide but I think with this product coming in the future I'd rather spend extra cash on this (Even if its rumored to be like 80 euro) to know theres no chance of knicking my PCB and wrecking the brand new CPU..I think I'd cry if I bought a 6700k and wrecked it in the process of delidding lol

                            http://www.guru3d.com/news-story/del...-die-mate.html
                            I think there is still a risk involved. If it's not seated properly or the tool is defective in anyway, then it's going to destroy your CPU. It looks cool but I'd rather save 80 bucks and at least be in control over the delidding process.

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                            • #15
                              Hmmm, I might try this process on my backup system (3570K). I wonder if Liquid Ultra can be found locally. My temps on that system are kinda crappy, so I was thinking about reseating the motherboard / CPU block, but might as well delid it and do it right!

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